Dublin City


Dublin, Dublin & More Dublin

Dublin is the capital city and home to almost one-third of the population of the Republic of Ireland. It is by far the largest city on the island and is growing apace with some estimates suggesting that the current population of 1.3 million could grow to 2 million over the next 20 years! While it may not have the historical sites of Rome, or London’s high fashion, it has a character and appeal uniquely of its own.

Central Dublin is not big covering an area of 44.4 square kilometers and it is easy to find your way around. At its heart is the river Liffey and O’Connell Bridge, with the Ha’penny Bridge nearby, crossing the famed River Liffey. The Liffey runs from east to west, acting as a physical and social barrier that divides the city into north and south. Traditionally the south side has been regarded as the wealthier end of town, and possesses most of the city`s historic sites and up-market centres for shopping and socializing.

On the northside of the river from the Guinness Brewery is the historic Smithfield area, scene of the famous horse sales and home to the Old Jameson Distillery, while further west lies Collins Barracks, home to the National Museum’s collection of decorative arts, and the massive expanse of Phoenix park. Just to the south of Smithfield is the impressive Four Courts, while heading east along the river will take you to the city’s main thoroughfare, O’Connell Street from which the rebellion was launched that resulted in Irish independence. Just to the east of here stands another great Dublin building, the Custom House, while further north Parnell Square home to the Hugh Lane and the adjacent Dublin Writers Museum. To the northeast lies stands Croke Park, the splendid stadium of the GAA, containing one of the city’s most enthralling museums.




Our Take

With almost one-third of the Republic residing in the nation's capital, this is where it's all at. Welcome to the largest village in Europe! Ver busy and traffic congestion makes it difficult to get around. Park you car - take the bus or Luas and you will be far happier.

Causey Experience

Our Be Irish For A Day programme gives a lighthearted insight into many aspects of Irish rural family life.


Guinness Storehouse

For the finest views and finest Guinness in Dublin a visit to the Guinness Storehouse is essential. This is undoubtedly Dublin’s most popular attraction and although the history of this company started in 1759 with the establishment of a brewery on this site, it is generally agreed that the Irish people are the spiritual owners of this renowned company.


Dublin City

Dublin is the capital city and home to almost one-third of the population of the Republic of Ireland. It is by far the largest city on the island and is growing apace with some estimates suggesting that the current population of 1.3 million could grow to 2 million over the next 20 years!


Grafton Street

Grafton Street is the commercial spine of Dublin’s most popular and stylish shopping district. There’s no finer place for people watching than the pedestrian thoroughfare that is Grafton.


Dublin's Cathedrals

Dublin has two Cathedrals, both Anglican, both quite close to each other and both loved by Dubliners despite the absence in the city of a Catholic Cathedral. St. Patrick's, or the "People's Cathedral and Christchurch originally built by the first Viking king of Dublin to be converted to Christianity.


Trinity College (Book of Kells)

Established in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth 1, Trinity College was originally founded as a Protestant College. At its foundation, the college offered free education to Catholics who were prepared to change their religion, and right up until the 1970s...read on!


Jameson Whiskey Centre

Ireland, home of the 'water of life' has in no small part to political and historical reasons, not been left with a lot of working distilleries. The Jameson Heritage Centre was once a fully working distillery but is now open exclusively as a visitor attraction, but that doesn't lessen the effects of the tasting.


Temple Bar Cultural Quarter

Temple Bar is sometimes referred to as Dublin's Cultural Quarter but that is really a cute euphemism for the place to be at night. Temple Bar is the pulsing heart of tourist Dublin. The name Temple Bar owes its name to Sir William Temple who bought the plot in the late 16th century and until the 1980s remained very much a run down part of the city.


Temple Bar Food Market

The Temple Bar Food Market is the must do on a Saturday afternoon in Dublin city centre selling an array of produce from Sushi to Salsas and Dublin's finest organic foods.